Thursday, October 11, 2018

Fall Leaf ID Hike with Class C students

This week two representatives from Class C came out to enjoy the peak Fall colors and visit the bees with Doug. We photographed and identified many trees.

Sugar Maple from the front yard of the Homestead.

American Basswood

Butternut?

Ash of some sort

Maple with galls.

Doug, pointing out the "Yellow Wood" where two roads might diverge.

Bitternut Hickory

Ash


Red Maple left and Sugar Maple right

Red Oak

Red Oak bottom and White Oak top

Ironwood AKA Hop Hornbeam

Yellow Birch or Muscle Wood (I forget which one it was)

Massive Red Oak leaf from by the Sugar Shack

Cool Sugar Maple leaf that is transitioning to yellow

Black Cherry

Blackberry. Doug thinks we should rename Strawberry Hill to Blackberry Hill

European Buckthorn (Boo! Hiss!)

Paper Birch

Butternut!

Elderberry 

Elderberry

Quacking Aspen

Red Oak with oddly shaped fruit

Prickly Ash


Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Rainy Day Harvest October 9th

Next week we start our first Farm Stay of the school year. It is a turning point for us. The Elementary visits are largely done (except Class H), and we turn our focus to adolescents. They will help harvest next week!

This week it is the Land School staff in the rain:

Broccoli and Cauliflower - a little is left out there
Romanesco, Cabbage, and Kale - a lot!
Turnips, Radishes, Black Spanish Radishes
Napa Cabbage

Onions - Red and Yellow
Shallots
Garlic

Potatoes - Red and Yellow
Tomatoes
Peppers
Hot Peppers
Eggplant

Beets
Swiss Chard

Carrots
Parsley
Dill

Winter Squash
Pumpkins

Apples



Monday, October 1, 2018

Harvest List for Market Tuesday Oct 2nd

Carrots
Potatoes
Onions
Shallots
Beets
Turnips
Cabbage
Nappa Cabbage
Baby Bok Choy
Lettuce Mix
Radishes
Three Kinds of Kale
Swiss Chard
Cauliflower
Broccoli
Romanesco Cauliflower
Peppers - Green and Red
Tomatoes
Eggplant
Hot Peppers
Parsley
Winter squash - Butternut, Kabocha, Delicata
Pie Pumpkins
Dill
Rosemary
Apples

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Early Fall Fungus Finding Foray with Class F

This week we took four groups of Class F students focused firmly on finding fungus. Photos to
follow. Any ID's are tentative pending confirmation. Please do not eat any wild mushrooms unless you are absolutely sure they are not poisonous.

Lobster mushroom

Large one with lavender gills

Suspicious one next to three small chanterelles.

Bolete that may have been colonized by another fungus

Red capped double mushroom

Aborted Entoloma

These were small (two inches) in a cluster. I thought they were puffballs at first.

Entoloma?

Also Entoloma?

Spore print from a VERY slimy gilled mushroom


Aborted entoloma and regular entoloma next to each other

Jelly-like coral fungus

First Group by Pond

Second Group Behind Red Barn

Third Group by Treehouse

Fourth Group Winding Ridge Trail

Lobster








Aborted Entoloma





Puffball


On an Elm tree



Puffball cut in half


Not a mushroom 




































One student thinks this is "dead man's finger"